Seated dip machine

Use this machine move to attack the backs of your upper arms with a vengeance

October 10, 2008
Seated dip machine

When it comes to scorching your triceps at the gym, the tendency may be to do several sets of pressdowns, kickbacks and maybe even a few push-ups. But one piece of equipment that often gets overlooked is the seated dip machine. Though it works in a fixed range of motion, the seated dip machine is a great alternative to bodyweight dips - one of the best triceps moves around, period. Here's how to get the most out of it so that you can sculpt a set of enviable tri's.

WHY IT WORKS: This is one of the few triceps exercises that's also a multijoint move, meaning you can recruit more muscle fibers and use more weight.

DO IT RIGHT: Sit upright with your back against the pad and tighten the belt over your lap, if there's one available. With a palms-in grip on the handles and your wrists straight, press the handles to full arm extension. Momentarily hold the peak contraction and slowly return to the start without letting the weight touch down between reps.

INSIDER'S TIP: "Keep your elbows in tight to your sides to emphasize the triceps, not flared out from your sides," Garcia says. "To reduce stress on the joints, it's also smart to not lock out your elbows."

>> Building the seated dip machine into your routine is easy. Since it's a compound, or multijoint movement, you should do it first or second in your workout, when you are strongest. Try this routine for a well-rounded triceps blitz.

Exercise
Sets/Reps
Seated dip machine
4/10-12
Close-grip push-up
3/To failure
Overhead rope extension
3/10-12
Single-arm reverse-grip pressdown
3/10-12

RELATED ARTICLES:
TANK-TOP BOOTCAMP
BENCH PRESS BASICS
DUMBBELL LYING TRICEPS EXTENSION